About David Kadavy

kadavy-cardigan-cropI’m David Kadavy. I’m author of Design for Hackers: Reverse-Engineering Beauty (which debuted in the top 20 on all of Amazon). I also host a podcast called Love Your Work (iTunes), where I’ve interviewed entrepreneurs and creators such as Jason Fried, Dan Ariely, James Altucher, Ryan Holiday, Laura Roeder, Noah Kagan, and many more.

I used to be a product designer in Silicon Valley, but I’ve since doubled down on my love for writing, after accidentally becoming an author. My writing has been featured in Observer, The Huffington Post, Inc.com, Quartz, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, Upworthy, and Lifehacker. I currently do most of my writing and thought experimentation on Medium, and I’m very active on Twitter, and have a Facebook Page.

I offer a free email course to learn web design, a course to learn the principles of visual design, and an entire course about white space.

In addition to my regular Design for Hackers email list, I have a book recommendations list.

I worked with behavioral scientist Dan Ariely to reinvent Google Calendar. The company we worked on, Timeful, was bought by Google, and many of those features are now in Google Calendar.

I currently live in Medellín, Colombia, which I chose as my home base after extended stays in many places around the world. I’m originally from Omaha, Nebraska, and have also lived in San Francisco; Chicago; San Jose; Kearney, Nebraska; Ames, Iowa; and I’ve done month-or-longer stints in many other places.

What is my work like?

While I’m my own person, with my own viewpoints, readers often compare me to Tim Ferriss (They cite my somewhat nomadic lifestyle, my tendency toward building passive revenue streams for further exploration. I’m less rational and rigorous, and less-interested in “top performers.”), James Altucher (I’ve long been interested in the idea of self-investment. I’ve never been as rich, and I only aspire to be as open.), Sam Harris (I’m interested in the contours of the mind, and try to speak with similar precision. You’ll probably never hear me mention religion, and am not a neuroscientist.), and Ramit Sethi (He’s a friend, and inspiration, but I’m more interested in writing and podcasting than in building online courses.) I recognize that these are all highly famous and accomplished people, which makes them useful examples, but I don’t mean to suggest that I actually compare to them.

I’m interested in how to build habits that cultivate Deep Work, the ways that attempts at rationality lead us astray, and the balance between technological progress and exploring human experience. By the time you’re reading this, I’m probably interested in a whole set of other things.

Kadavy.net on WPEngine

Kadavy.net has been hosted with numerous companies on numerous platforms, but is now happily served up on WPEngine. You can get a special deal on hosted WordPress if you use his special WPEngine free trial. They make it so damn easy. It’s great. No updating or getting hacked (knock on wood).

Saying “Kadavy”

It’s KAD-uh-VEE: “KAD” like “CAT,” “uh” like “duh,” “VEE” like “KNEE.” But, David’s not really too picky about what you call him, as long as it’s not “jerkface,” or something like that.

Common misspellings include cadavy, catavy, katavy, cadavey, and kadavey.

Contacting David

If you want to get in touch with David, you can always @mention him on Twitter, but he also gets email at david (at) kadavy (dot) net.

Call David

If you’d like to get real-time advice from David about running a solopreneur business, building online courses, nomadic lifestyle, podcasting, writing, book marketing, email marketing, SEO, design, or anything else, book a call with him on Clarity.fm.

Photos / Headshots

Click any of the below images to access a high-resolution version.

kadavy-cardigan-crop kadavy-2016-circular-avatar kadavy-writing