David Kadavy

David Kadavy is author of the #18 Amazon best-seller, Design for Hackers, & host of Love Your Work

Posts from the Health Category

Beating “Chronic Lyme Disease”

November 01, 2016

About two years ago, after something like 20 years of mysterious maladies, my doctor diagnosed me with “Chronic Lyme Disease.” This diagnosis raises red flags for many people, because it’s doubtful whether “Chronic Lyme Disease” even exists (I discuss this further down in the post under “Diagnosis”). I share some of these doubts, but I’ll continue to refer to the condition as such for the sake of simplicity. keep on reading »

This split keyboard may be the biggest thing since your standing desk

February 11, 2014

UPDATE, March 10, 2016: A few months ago, I switched to the UltraErgo Wireless Split Keyboard (thanks to commenters stcorbett and cfc).

Here’s the UltraErgo (left, with its tiny USB dongle), next to the Kinesis (right).

ultraergo-kinesis-split-keyboards

The UltraErgo is objectively better than the Kinesis Freestyle2 on nearly every dimension that matters to me.

The UltraErgo is not without compromises, though. A few potential “cons:”

Since portability is a huge factor for me, this keyboard is a clear winner for me, but if you’d prefer a keyboard built for a Mac, you may prefer the Kinesis.

Here is the UltraErgo as I use it. There are two “slant” settings, and I prefer it on the lowest one. Notice that there are “battery” indicators on the UltraErgo. The keyboard comes with a mini-USB (?) cable for charging (?) the keyboard. I never had to use this, but I did it anyway, and that was months ago. The keyboard came with no instructions nor manual.

ultraergo-split-keyboard-slanted

Here is the UltraErgo ready to be put in my backpack (I just keep the tiny dongle in my USB port), next to my Kinesis. You can see the flaps that deploy to slant the UltraErgo. The difference in size and weight is night-and-day in a backpack.

ultraergo-kinesis-split-keyboards-travel

Now, back to the original post:


Standing desks are everywhere these days. More and more office workers are switching over to standing desks, to prevent the health problems associated with sitting. keep on reading »

Contact Lenses for Dry Eyes

August 03, 2008

Back in the good ol’ days, I could spend countless hours on my computer without much care – except for ergonomics, maybe. I noticed over the last few years that I was able to spend less and less time on my computer – my young supple eyes aren’t getting any younger. Apparently this is creatively referred to as Dry Eyes Syndrome. I figured there was no hope – that my days of spending long stretches on my computer were over; but a friend of mine told me to try Acuvue Oasys contact lenses. The Acuvue Oasys lenses – when used with Clear Care – have worked great for me. I’ll tell you more about it in this video.

Here’s a summary of the video:

Apparently, the problem is that most contact lenses are made with too much water. The contact lenses dry out during the day, and then wick moisture from your eyes. Which is a bad thing. One alternative is to switch to Gas Permeables, but they require an adaption period – though the vision they provide is supposedly superior to soft lenses.

Lenses like Acuvue Oasys are made with a Silicone Hydrogel, which contains less water than most lenses. Apparently this doesn’t fix dry eye discomfort for everyone, but it definitely works for me. Silicone Hydrogel is also used to make lenses that can be worn for 30 days at a time without removing them. That just sounds painful to me!

The Clear Care lens care system is a hydrogen peroxide system, which works great for me. For times that I’m traveling though, it’s not always convenient for me to use this system. In these cases, I’ve been advised to use straight saline solution because the chemicals in the multi-purpose solutions will get embedded into the lenses. I’ve got to wonder if I can just use hydrogen peroxide instead of the Clear Care system, though 😛 It would be much cheaper! (PS don’t try this – of if you do, it’s at your own risk. you may end up like this poor girl)

You can buy Acuvue Oasys lenses at 1-800-CONTACTS, and Clear Care at Amazon.

Doctor/Patient Relationships 2.0

April 22, 2008

I have a foot injury right now. The bottom of my foot sort of hurts. I could go to the doctor, but I don’t because of a couple of reasons. 1) I already know what he’ll say: “stay off it, keep it elevated, ice it regularly, and take ibuprofen” and 2) because while I’m one of the lucky Americans who has health insurance, my insurance totally blows. A simple checkup would probably cost me about $150.

keep on reading »

Is Wheat Gluten Causing Your Sinus Symptoms?

August 01, 2007

[UPDATE: 12/13/2016]
I eventually was diagnosed with, and started treating “Chronic Lyme Disease” (or something like that). Here’s a podcast discussion with the author of The Whals Protocol (the diet I now follow to manage chronic inflammation), Dr. Terry Whals.

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Until recently, I was prone to sinus infections – or not so much prone, but rather, I had a sinus infection all of the time. My voice was nasally, I was fatigued all of the time, and I pretty much felt gross. I had seen a number of doctors over the years for my recurrent sinusitis. They tended to test me for environmental allergies, stick a camera up my nose, and ultimately prescribe some bullshit allergy medication that didn’t work, or even convince me to try nasal irrigation – which was actually their best idea. keep on reading »

Sinus Rinse Nasal Irrigation

June 07, 2005

[UPDATE: 03/26/2008 11:02AM]
If you’ve been keeping up, you know now that I have discovered that wheat gluten can cause sinus symptoms. So, you may want to consider experimenting.

[UPDATE: 11/01/2016]
I eventually was diagnosed with, and started treating “Chronic Lyme Disease” (or something like that)

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After this post I’m sure I will be the blogger who talks about mucous more than any other. It truly isn’t by design. If you don’t want to read a gross post, I’d suggest not reading further.

keep on reading »

Lump In Mouth or Lip? Maybe a Mucocele

January 29, 2005

Right before New Year’s, I noticed a lump inside of my lower lip. Now, being the hypochondriac that I am, I was naturally petrified that I had Oral Cancer. Why? I’m certainly not at risk. I don’t have a family history of Cancer. I’m 25, not a smoker or chewer, and am otherwise healthy. Because any Google search for “lump in mouth” or lump in lip will likely have even a reasonable person convinced that this is a sure sign of Oral Cancer. keep on reading »